Take Advantage of College Summer Programs

By Drew Murphy

Last summer, I had the opportunity to attend the UMass Amherst Sports Management and Leadership Academy. The camp took place on campus for two weeks and I don’t think I’ve ever been more grateful for something before. I learned material for a whole semester in the span of two weeks and still don’t know how the professors did it. The whole experience was so eye-opening. The program really showed you all of the careers that you can pursue, from jobs in marketing to even becoming an agent.

The camp not only helped me learn about the field I want to pursue, and the school I want to attend, but it also helped me become a better person by putting myself out there and making relationships. I now have connections with important people at UMass Amherst like Director of Sports Management Will Norton and Professor/ Lecturer Brett Albert.

If you are thinking about what you would like to do in the future, a college camp could be the best thing to do. Many campuses offer these programs but none are as good as the UMass Amherst summer programs. They welcome you and make you feel like family. It really gives you the college experience as you are away from home for two weeks and on your own. It may seem that I am biased toward this school but, in reality, you won’t find a summer program as impactful and comprehensive as the UMass Summer Programs. Everything about my experience could not have been better and I highly suggest you consider opportunities  like this for yourself.

HHS Secretary Moves to New Job in District

By Ben Asnes, CJ Damore and Emily Gallagher

Originally published in the Stall Street Journal, created by Ms. Fraser’s POST program

Mrs. Deborah Kinney, a familiar face at HHS, has left to take a new position with the district central office. Mrs. Kinney has worked at Hanover High School for the past eight years as an administrative assistant in the main office. Growing up on the South Shore, she attended Quincy Public Schools for most of her childhood. Upon graduation, she enrolled at Assumption College in Worcester, where she majored in business and minored in mathematics. In her free time she enjoys walking, hiking, yoga, and spending time with family. Ten years from now, she hopes to own her own bed and breakfast somewhere up North.

When asked what her favorite experience was while working at Hanover High School, Mrs. Kinney replied: “Everything!! Especially working with the staff and students!”

Mrs. Kinney, thanks for all that you do and the person you are! You surely will be missed here at HHS! We wish you the best of luck.

Replacing her in the main office will be Ms. Susan Piche. 

Latest HHS Musical was a Smash Hit!

By Tim Sullivan

You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown was a smash hit this past week! The cast, crew, pit orchestra, and production staff put together an amazing performance that truly captivated the audience, including myself. 

I saw the show twice, once on opening night with the wonderful cast of Kyle Knight as Charlie Brown, Michelle Sylvester as Sally, Emma Gannon as Lucy, Ben Manning as Schroeder, Christopher Manning as Linus, and Julia Cross as Snoopy. I just had to go back for a second time and see the understudy cast which starred Kat Sheridan as Sally, Elise Falvey as Lucy, and Erin Foley as Snoopy. Both shows featured a colorful, cheery ensemble which included Brendan Connolly, Rosie Danehy, Kyle Donnelly, Norah Flanders, Callia Gilligan, Jordan Kennedy, Daniel Manning, Emma Massey, Anthony Pierotti, Harper Seelye, and Erin Shea.

This show delivered meaningful messages to the audience about growing up, feeling alone, and finding happiness. These messages were conveyed through the lighthearted comedy and youthful innocence that is classic for any sort of Charlie Brown production – something the cast pulled off beautifully. Each musical number was energetic and engaging, not to mention several were completely student-choreographed! The Indian’s own Callia Galligan was dance captain for the production. Callia said she has always wanted to do something like this but has never had the opportunity and this was definitely a highlight of the musical this year for her. It wasn’t too much of a challenge to translate the music into dance, she said, but it “took a lot of thought to determine what steps would translate the energy or theme of a certain song.” 

The cast’s ability to disguise themselves as younger kids who are just growing up was quite impressive. The border between being a kid and becoming mature was shown throughout the show. It was shown in Lucy’s desire to be queen and her eventual appreciation for Charlie Brown being himself. It was shown in Sally’s pursuit of adventure but also her determination. This time of growth was also shown in Linus’ need to be accompanied by his blanket in My Blanket and Me and his almost comical intelligence. I was blown away by Snoopy’s portrayal both times that I saw the show. Both Julia and Erin brought Snoopy to life as a lovable and witty character. Specifically in the number Suppertime, which was student-choreographed, It was hard to keep myself from not giving a standing ovation in the middle of the show. Although I have no idea what dogs think, somehow this felt right! 

Charlie Brown’s character highlights the innocence and fear that comes with feeling alone, having a crush, and learning to appreciate who you are. Kyle Knight, who played Charlie Brown, said it was an amazing experience!  Kyle has been doing musicals since his sophomore year and playing the title role this year was, he said, “both a big responsibility and something I was very excited to do!” Kyle was happy to be able to perform with some of his really close friends in the cast and crew. When I asked him if he felt for Charlie Brown or could relate to the character he was playing, he said, “How could you not? He’s a kid who just can’t get a break and wants the best for himself but can’t seem to figure it out and I’m sure everyone can relate to that at the very least a little bit.” \

 

The Pit Orchestra made the musical that much more enjoyable and brought outstanding emotion to the show. Senior Una Davenport enjoyed “making new friends, memories, and getting to play fun music” in the pit the past three years. The last three musicals at HHS have been different each year and Una was glad that You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown had, “more room for comedic expression, which was fun to explore.” Una appreciated the constant encouragement from Mr. Wade and Mr. Harden and how much time they devoted over the short period they have to prepare for the musical each year. This year, Una played both electric and upright bass, which she hasn’t played in the pit before. “Overall, the job of the pit is to make the cast sound as good as we can and their phenomenal talent combined with the direction from Mr. Fahey made it effortless,” Una said. Now that the musical is over, it is bittersweet, she said, adding that she is grateful for the memories she made and the new meaning to the word Happiness she discovered.  

My favorite number was certainly Happiness and the powerful lyrics “Happiness is anyone and anything at all that’s loved by you.” I also loved when the cast came together in both Beethoven Day and The Book Report. Make sure to follow @hanoverhighdramaclub on Instagram to stay up to date with the drama club. I am so glad that I was able to witness such greatness put on by our talented peers this past week!  

Giving Back to the Community During the Holidays

by Grace Van Duyn

With the holidays coming up, people are beginning to get excited, hanging decorations or making their wishlists for presents. But many families and children struggle to celebrate the holidays and worry about the  expenses that come along with them. Although it seems like a big task to find a way to help all these families in need, local organizations have made it easier for volunteers to help.

Christmas in the City is an annual party for homeless and other families who struggle with poverty in Boston. Serving 6,000 children and families each year, the event provides free food, live entertainment, an indoor amusement park and gifts for everyone who attends. Families are offered free haircuts, health screenings, and dental screenings as well. This year’s event takes place on Dec. 21 and relies on thousands of volunteers.

Another local organization called Globe Santa is a charity that delivers gifts to local children who otherwise might not receive any. More than three million children have benefited from this during the past six decades. Sponsored by The Boston Globe newspaper, Globe Santa is a great organization to donate to during this holiday season and would help many children.

Marshfield Community Christmas is an all-volunteer organization that provides food certificates and toys for families struggling with expenses that come along with the celebration of the holidays. This program is the closest to us in Hanover and also gives people many different ways to volunteer. You can be as involved as delivering the gifts directly to people’s houses or you can make a  donation.

Maura’s Hopeful Mission out of Scituate provides meals, clothing, and other donations for the homeless in Boston. If you are interested in donating, you can check them out on Facebook. This organization is run year-round and welcomes any and all help throughout the year.

Many parents are not able to buy gifts for their children or to buy food for their holiday celebrations. But these families deserve to be as happy as those who are more fortunate. If you are looking to help those in our community, these are some great ways to help and offer numerous ways to get involved. These are just a few examples of groups helping the community during the holiday season and would be good opportunities to spread holiday cheer and maybe get some community service hours.

For more information:

https://christmasinthecity.org/news/

https://globesanta.org/aboutus.aspx#history

https://www.facebook.com/MaurasHopefulMission/

marshfieldcommunitychristmas.org

 

You’re A Good Man Charlie Brown: Students take the stage

By Callia Gilligan

It’s that time of year again: Fall Musical Season! This year, Hanover High School, in partnership with Hanover Performing Arts Company, will be presenting “You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown!”

The hit musical features your favorite Peanuts characters Charlie Brown, Lucy, Shroeder, Linus, Sally, and Snoopy. Written in 1967 by by Clark Gesne, the story returns you to your favorite Peanuts cartoons and reminds you of all the antics this crazy gang can get into. With songs like “Happiness,” “Beatoven Day” “My Blanket & Me,” and “My New Philosophy,” the show is stacked with singing, dancing, and comedy that is sure to make you nostalgic.

The show features a talented cast with Kyle Knight (’20) leading as Charlie Brown. He’s joined by Ben Manning (’22) as Shroeder, Michelle Sylvester (’21) as Sally, Emma Gannon (’20) as Lucy, Chris Manning (’22) as Linus and Julia Cross (’20) as Snoopy. In addition, at the Saturday matinee performance, Lucy will be played by Elise Falvey (’21), Sally will be played by Kat Sheridan (’21) and Erin Foley (’20) will play Snoopy. They are joined by a talented ensemble from all four grades as well.

The show is directed by Mr. Colin Fahey with musical direction by Mr. Micheal Wade. There is also a student-led technical crew!

You won’t want to miss this sensation! Performances will be Nov. 21 and Nov. 22 at 7 pm, and Nov. 23 at 2 pm and 7 pm.

 

Spirit Week 2019

By Tim Sullivan

Just like that, another Spirit Week and Homecoming have come and gone!

This year the Spirit Week themes were:

Monday: America Day 

Tuesday: Hawaiian Day

Wednesday: Decade Day

Thursday: Jersey Day

Friday: Class Color Day

Seniors led the way with the most participants on Decade and Class Color Days. Juniors had just as much spirit, rocking America and Jersey Days. The sophomores took the crown for Hawaiian Day.

The annual Spirit Week Rally was held on Friday, Oct. 25 and included performances by our band and cheerleaders, along with exciting events such as a race across the gym with teams wrapped in saran wrap. A noise competition, judged by Doc DeFranzo, revealed which class was the loudest – spoiler alert: the Seniors won, but the Juniors made it a close contest.

That night, Hanover hosted North Quincy for our Homecoming game and won 33-6. During half time, this year’s Homecoming court was announced. Seniors Bella Craft and Evan Bilton are Hanover’s Homecoming Queen and King! Sara Norton, Erin Halpin, and Lauren Reynolds along with Ethan Ghostlaw, Ethan Richie, and Tim Sullivan were also recognized as our Homecoming Court.

On Saturday, Oct. 26, HHS held its annual Homecoming Dance. Except for the abundance of crowd surfing, the dance went on as usual and this was the final event of our Spirit Week for 2019. Check out some pictures below!

 

 

Many Kids Feel Broken on the Inside

By Sam Wing

It was on the rare occasion that I saw my aunt. We were sitting down at the kitchen table talking about how each of us was doing. At some point in our conversation she told me, “ I don’t know why, but your generation is struggling.” Even before she had told me this, I was already aware of the idea that kids nowadays are truly struggling. It’s the fact that I had heard someone actually say the truth out loud that really hit me. What she said got me thinking for days about what was the cause for all of this strife. 

Now, I’ll try my best not to bore anyone who’s reading this article, but in order to understand the present, we must understand the past. Before all of these technological advances that we have now, we just had the world itself. Meaning that people didn’t stare at their devices or watch a Saturday Night Live episode at 12:30 am. People just had each other, and whatever nature had to provide. Back then, kids would go out and just play in the streets with each other until the sun began to fall. When the sun went down, they would say their goodbyes to each other and rush inside for a hot meal with their family. Then, after dinner as a family, it was bedtime. That was it; well, not entirely. They still had school, but school was never as intense as it is now. 

Now I know some of you are sitting there thinking, “ Like, what was the point of explaining that?” Well the point of explaining that, was to show you what kids used to be like then, and well, how they are now. Nowadays, “ an hour of free play is like a drop of water in the desert (Brooks).” Kids don’t have that luxury anymore of going outside and playing in the streets. Many kids deal with the stress of getting into the best college, having the “golden” transcript, making the varsity soccer team, or even worrying if their parents will make it home for dinner. These are just a couple of examples, but it just goes to show that things like these are what gives kids that anxiety or even depression.

In an article by The New York Times, Kim Brooks explains to readers the increase in depression and suicidal thoughts in kids nowadays. “ According to the psychologist Peter Gray, children today are more depressed than they were during the Great Depression and more anxious than they were at the height of the Cold War. A 2019 study published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology found that between 2009 and 2017, rates of depression rose by more than 60 percent among those ages 14 to 17, and 47 percent among those ages 12 to 13.”

I remember reading this portion of the article and having my mind blown into a million pieces. For years, I felt that I was wrong to think that kids nowadays were worse off, but who knew that my gut feeling was actually right. However, it didn’t end there. Just because I had gotten the answer I had wondered about for years, didn’t mean that I was gonna stop pushing deeper for the true reason of this tragedy. So I sat there for a solid 15 minutes and came to my conclusion. Kids have all these responsibilities that kids back then would never have to deal with. So I asked myself, “ Where did all of these new responsibilities come from?” They came from us, the human race. As we kept inventing and growing our culture, there came new tasks. For instance, we had the “medical boom.” Doctors and medicine improved greatly, causing humans to have a greater lifespan. And with a greater lifespan, that meant that they had more time to keep working and create more. With more innovations and expectations, comes more jobs and tasks for people to worry about. And with this growth, in everything, we began to crave more. 

We all want perfection, whether we will admit it or not. But the truth is is that we can’t have perfection because it doesn’t exist. We keep chasing after these ridiculous things because it’s what our society claims is the best. We live in a world that only praises the best, and looks down on the worst. We don’t want to be looked down on by others, so we paint an image. Or a better way to phrase it is a fake image. To pretend that we all have our lives together so others don’t make a fool out of us. It’s kind of crazy to think about it in that way, but it’s the truth. The reason why kids are worse off today is because we feel trapped. Like the whole world is yelling at us to do everything, and do everything right when we can’t. One person can’t do it all without having a breakdown. We all have our own limits in life, but lately, we all tend to ignore our limits. 

So what now? What do we do from here? Honestly, I don’t know. I’ve only lived on this planet for 16 years. I haven’t seen enough of the world to see what else is going on. So I guess for now all we really can do is stop. Stop thinking about all the chaos in our lives and just stop and take the time to take care of ourselves mentally more often than physically. And maybe, just maybe, we’ll all come to realize that mental health really matters. 

Article: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/17/opinion/sunday/childhood-suicide-depression-anxiety.html?searchResultPosition=1

Featured image: https://www.nutraceuticalbusinessreview.com/news/article_page/Research_shows_extract_improves_anxiety_and_depressive_symptoms/143911