Dominican Republic Trip: Science, Service, Sun

By Matt O’Hara

If you’re interested in conservation, community service or even just spending February vacation in a land guaranteed to be much warmer than snowy New England, Mrs. Emerson is looking for you.

The HHS science teacher has planned 8-day service trip  to the Dominican Republic which will teach students about the importance of coral reefs in the environment, and how overfishing, tourism and climate change are damaging the coral reefs in the Caribbean. While on the trip, students will team up with Verde Profundo, an organization dedicated to rebuilding coral reefs, to gather coral reef shards that have been separated from their reefs and have washed up on Dominican beaches. The students will then transplant the fragments back into the reefs and help preserve the important, but fragile, ocean ecosystem. Students will also meet with marine biologists to learn about different types of coral reefs and their impact on the environment. When the students have downtime, they can educate themselves about the interesting culture of the Dominican Republic and explore the beautiful area, while participating in memorable activities such as snorkeling.

Only a few spots remain for the trip, according to Mrs. Emerson, who visited the country herself this summer. “To say the least, it was a profoundly moving and influential experience,” she said.  “I can honestly say that [you] are going to have the experience of a lifetime.”

If you are interested in learning more, please attend the student and parent meeting about the trip on October 4th.

 

My Experience as a Junior Maine Guide: Tough but Rewarding

This summer I had the opportunity to participate in the Junior Maine Guide Program (JMG). JMG is sponsored by the Maine Summer Camps Association and Maine’s Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. A Maine Guide is someone who is legally licensed by the state of Maine to be paid to lead wilderness trips within the state. This can include whitewater rafting, hunting, fishing, kayaking or the most common, recreation. Junior Maine Guide was started by Maine Summer Camps Association with approval from the DIFW. A majority of Maine summer camps offer the JMG program. It’s a four-week ordeal.  For three weeks you learn about how to be a “trip leader” and then you attend a five-day testing camp in Rangely, Maine, where you are tested on skills such as axemanship, wet day fire, first aid, canoeing, and topographic maps. JMG is honestly hard to understand if you’ve never done it yourself, but I’ll try my best to explain the program through my experience. 

I went into JMG with no idea how physically, emotionally and mentally taxing the program was going to be. I’ve been attending my summer camp for five years. When I was 12, I was first introduced to JMG. My summer camp offered one of the JMG programs for younger campers called Junior Maine Woodsmen. I went through that, passed and, when I was 13, I participated in Maine Woodsmen in order to have eligibility to participate in JMG. I passed MW, but then decided to wait a year and do JMG for my last summer as a camper. 

JMG met two activity periods every day. There were five other girls from my camp doing the program with me. It was a lot of taking notes and studying. It was kind of like school in the summer except you were learning to take care not only for yourself in the wilderness but also for a group of younger campers. We had to learn lots of skills for written tests like First Aid and Map of Maine, but the practical tests were the most important. I learned how to swing an ax and build a fire in under 20 minutes with a wet piece of wood. This was all in preparation for a five-day testing camp.

JMG took up a lot of my summer. Every morning I would wake up at 7 am and study. I made an insane amount of flashcards and had my cabinmates quiz me. I once used my best friend as a First Aid dummy to practice. Most free swims and every rest hour, I would study. JMG took a huge physical toll on my body as well. When we first learned axemanship, I woke up the next morning feeling so sore in places I didn’t think were relative to splitting wood. 

I don’t think I’ve ever been more stressed than in the days leading up to JMG. I couldn’t eat or sleep very much. One of the most hyped-up tests for JMG is “Wet Day Fire.” With a wet day, a billet of wood gets soaked in water for 5 minutes. In order to pass the test, you need to split the billet to get to the dry wood, build a fire with it, and get a small can of water to boil over in under 20 minutes. It’s extremely challenging, and its only a minor. What’s scary about Wet Day Fire is it’s the only test where you know whether you passed or failed right on the spot. If you don’t pass, it can shake your confidence for the rest of the testing camp. The day before we left for testing camp, I still hadn’t completed a successful wet day. I went to try one more time before we left. To my surprise, I did it in 13:06, the fastest time out of anyone in my JMG group. This gave me so much more confidence going into what would be the most stressful but rewarding week of my life. 

Onto the fun part! Testing camp. The testing camp is “5 days” but in reality, it’s really only three days of testing. Three days to take 22 tests. We arrived on Monday and set up our camp. We were assigned a campsite, and from then on, you need to set up your tent, chopping block, fire pit and camp kitchen area. Every day, you need to keep your encampment looking as good as it did on the first day; in fact, that’s one of the tests. You are also graded on your cooking. So the first real test is Monday night dinner. At every meal, a tester comes to eat with you. In order to pass cooking, you need to have at least one successful bake, boil, and fry. They grade you basically on whether the meal was balanced, nutritious, complex and edible. They also want you to make sure you’re making good conversation with the testers. What’s good, though, is that if you fail a meal, they notify you and you have a chance to try again on another day.

Monday is not that stressful of a day, but Tuesday is where it picks up. On Tuesday I took lots of written tests, almost every minor expect the ones I needed to study for a bit more, and a couple of written majors. I also took my ax and canoe test. Canoeing, I thought, was very up in the air. In the canoe test, you need to be able to solo a canoe and answer general canoe questions for a tester sitting in front of you while you paddle. I missed a couple of questions, but my canoeing was pretty strong. I really had no clue how it went but because I was so stressed, I thought I failed. My ax test went extremely well. I had the tester who went to my summer camp. My camp has always had a reputation to be bad at ax so my tester was really happy with my skills. 

Tuesday night, we were reminded that Wet Day Fire Testing was the next day. I was so stressed, I cried myself to sleep that night. The next morning, I was a huge bundle of nerves. I barely got through my topographic maps test. The practical part of that test went well, the written did not. There were more tears right before I took my Wet Day because I watched one of my friends not pass hers. When the time came for me to take my test, I was panicking. I took several deep breaths and told myself that I could do it. When the tester said go, I swung my ax and went to town. Wet Day can have a lot of factors that make it really difficult. For instance, if the piece of wood you’re using is riddled with knots, it can make splitting the wood very difficult. Yay for me, that’s how my wet day wood was. It took me a good five minutes to split it, and normally, I could be done with my ax by three. Because of this, I went into panic mode. I very rapidly made wood pieces with my knife but making the wood shavings to start the fire took me a while. Once I had a good fire going, the stupid wind started to put it out. I just kept adding more and more wood until I had a huge fire. By then, someone near me had finished in 18:00 minutes. I was almost about to give up, I had no more wood to put on my fire and I was almost out of time. Luckily, one of the testers came over to me and was really encouraging. He told me that I had enough wood, my water was about to boil. What I needed to do was blow on the fire. That would give it more oxygen and help the water boil over. By then, another tester was over around my fire pit. They said to keep blowing on the fire and be patient, I was still in this. My fire was so hot, I singed my eyebrow. I was blowing on my fire until I literally couldn’t breathe. I noticed the fire had gone out and I looked up, the water had boiled over. “Ahh!” one of the testers yelled. I yelled “Time!” There was a moment of panic because the tester keeping track of time didn’t respond for a second. After what seemed like forever, she said “19:23.” I burst into tears. That was honestly one of the best moments of my life. I looked over to see my counselor had made it to watch the last couple of minutes of my test. The smile on her face made me cry even harder. I had to take a second to just look at my fire because I was so in shock and so proud. One of my friends thought I didn’t pass because I was so close to time and was crying. The rest of that day, I took very few tests, but there were more tears because I was stressed about this one test I was taking, Hiking and Backpacking. 

Thursday was a blur. It was a lot of crying and tests I thought I failed as well as tears of joy when it finally came time for the last campfire. One counselor told us before we left for testing camp, “if you don’t cry at least four times at testing camp, what are you doing?”  I have never been so relieved to be done with anything. I was so happy testing camp was over but so sad the JMG as a whole was too. 

When we got back to camp on Friday, It was so great to see everyone. We talked with one of the counselors who wasn’t able to go to the testing camp and told her all the funny things that happened while we were there. I was also so nervous though because we would know our results until Sunday.

When I woke up Sunday morning, I cried and then nearly threw up because my stomach was so tangled in a knot. I didn’t find out my results until right before I had to go visit my brother at his camp. The JMG counselor had us wait on this deck while one by one we went down and she gave us the news. When she handed me my test sheet she said, “No matter what’s on this, I’m so proud of you.” My eyes went immediately to the bottom of the page where it said, “Retest.” My heart dropped. I couldn’t even really get out tears because I was just so shaken. When the other JMGs were told by our other counselor I didn’t pass, everybody started crying, half out of sadness for me and half out of being scared they weren’t going to pass either. When I saw all of their red faces, that’s when tears came. There were lots of hugs and as I learned about whether the other girls passed or failed. I didn’t really cry more or less. I was genuinely so proud of all of my friends that I watched grow through this experience.

The rest of the day, I couldn’t function. My counselor had to take away the sheet with my test results because I kept staring at it and crying. What was so disappointing was that I came so close to passing. In order to pass, you can only fail 2 majors and I failed 3 and one minor. Two of the tests I failed, I came within 1-1.5  points of passing. It felt like passing was just beyond reach, and I almost had it. 

Over time, though, the tears went away and I realized something really important: how much I grew through this program. I became such a leader and my confidence has gone up. If I hadn’t done this, there was no way I would have been able to write an article about my failures. I learned so much, not just about the wilderness but how to handle failure. Crying and being angry is okay but eventually, you have to pick yourself back up and realize what your experience taught you. No one can take away the fact that I learned how to swing an ax or solo a canoe, and I learned to be independent and responsible, and I learned how to pick myself back up, even after I failed at something that I cared so deeply about. The rest of the summer, I encouraged younger girls to do JMG the next summer. I kept my Wet Day Billets with my times written on them and my compass and name tag displayed on my shelves and I openly talked about what this program has meant to me. 

JMG, pass or fail, is the most rewarding thing I have ever done. I’m so glad that I stepped outside my comfort zone and tried something new. JMG strengthened my love for the outdoors and made me so much more confident in myself. I’m so grateful that I was able to have this kind of experience that you can’t get anywhere else. 

Boston Players, Fans Primed for Stanley Cup Final

By Drew Murphy

To say the Boston Bruins have been amazing this year is an understatement. Tonight, they begin their 19th Stanley Cup Final and have a shot at winning their 7th NHL championship.

The Bruins started out by grinding out the regular season, finishing second in their division and second in the whole league with over 100 points on the season. In the first round of playoffs, they faced the Toronto Maple Leafs,a league rival and Original Six foe. Over the years, the Bruins have consistently beaten the Leafs in the playoffs, including a miraculous comeback in 2013 when the Bruins scored four goals in the dying minutes of the first game of the opening round series . This year, the two teams went to seven games in a grueling battle that ended with suspension, bruises and blood. 

Next up was the Columbus Blue Jackets, another very tough team who happened to be coming off the most historic first-round ever. As the last-seeded team in the playoffs, the Blue Jackets beat the top seed in a four-game sweep. The Bruins again faced a team that would give them a run for their money.  The Bruins had a 3-2 lead in the series heading into game 6, which started off extremely fast-paced with plenty of scoring chances for both teams. Eventually, veteran forward David Krejci put one home, giving the Bruins momentum and the rest of the game was theirs. David Backes and Marcus Johansson scored and the Bruins won 3-0. 

In the semifinals, they faced the Carolina Hurricanes, an unlikely opponent that grinded its way through the early rounds. The Bruins took care of them in a four game sweep, getting contributions from all four lines and especially Tuukka Rask, the goaltender having one of the best performances in the playoffs.

Going into the finals against the St. Louis Blues, the Bruins are locked in and focused and know what they need to do to win. With contributions from 1st line All-Stars Brad Marchand, Patrice Bergeron and David Pastrnak to 4th line standouts Sean Kuraly, Joakim Nordstrom, Noel Accarica and Chris Wagner,  the Bruins will be in great shape. The fans and the team are ready for the Boston Bruins to bring home their seventh Stanley Cup.

Robotics Club Tests its Mettle at Botball

After months of preparation, the HHS Robotics Club competed in the annual BotBall Tournament on April 27. Held at UMass Lowell, it’s a competition between schools and their robots. The theme this year was “disaster relief.”  The robots, built by students at their after school meetings throughout the year, had to put out fires, save people from flood zones, bring injured people to the hospital,  and bring supplies and uninjured people to the disaster relief area. The HHS team, which included juniors Adam Giordani, Matt Rowe and John Duff, made it through four rounds of double elimination, according to adviser, engineering teacher Pam Borgeson. The team finished 10th out of 22 schools.

SENIORS: What I Wish I Had Known Before HS

By Juli Cocomazzi

As the class of 2019 gets ready to leave the nest and embark on a new journey, many of them will be reminiscing about the last four years of their life. High school is one of the most transformative and critical stages in everyone’s life and, in many ways, it shapes who we are. Within these four years, we mature from impressionable young teens into young adults, ready to enter the real world. High school is the last four years of us being kids and it’s often one of the most challenging things we will ever have to go through. We all take our own paths and live unique lives, yet we are all in the same boat. We love to pretend that we know what we’re doing, but in reality, we’re all learning from each other. Here is some advice from our graduating seniors to show what they got from their high school experience:

Braden Glynn: Don’t regret anything, live every day to the fullest

Alex Stacy: Try hard in school as much or as little as you can because you want to have a good future and want to get into a good school. Make the most of your time here, get to know your peers because  the day that you graduate comes very quickly. You don’t see a lot of people after graduation and it’s scary, so try to make as many connections with new people in your grade as possible

Collin Wright: Have as much fun as possible every day instead of worrying about what other people think because high school shapes who you are as a person and you shouldn’t waste four years worrying about what other people think

Azalea Mayhew: Focus on the people in life that will only boost you and not bring you down

Andrea Contreras: Take advantage of meeting new people. There are so many types of people here in different clubs and different sports and you will meet so many who have the same interests as you so you can build more friends and more connections. You’re going to look back at graduation and see how many people you’ve become friends with. One of my friends that I met in high school is going to be my roommate in college, so it’s really nice.

Olivia Reddish: It definitely goes by faster than you think, so when everyone says it doesn’t go by fast, it does, so make the most of it

Caitlin Parker: One of my biggest regrets in high school was not getting involved in more clubs, I really feel like I limited myself. So if I had to do it again, I would definitely involve myself in more clubs and not just stick with sports and academics

Matt Meads: You don’t need to do homework

Greta Calkin: One thing that I regret and encourage for other people going to high school is branching out more and meeting new people and not just restricting yourself to the same people all four years. It’s more fun meeting new people and having memories with a bunch of other people throughout high school.

Abby Bulman: Study more. I know people say get on that grind, but you really should get on that grind. And be more selfless when you deal with other people, be super understanding and be more empathetic because it will follow you for the rest of your life

Karly Bruder: Life gets so much better when you stop caring about what everyone else is doing and start doing things that make you happy

Aidan Burke: Have thick skin, don’t take anything too seriously. Be your own person, only dead fish go with the flow. Always put yourself first, love and treat yourself more than anyone. Pay attention and make the extra effort to be present/personable in class, it opens doors when you have good relationships with teachers. Support lookool as much as possible and you are immediately cool. Make good with janitors if you can. Be bold, you only live once and high school only happens once. Enjoy yourself any way you can. See what you can get away with in your four years, homie.

Orlandis Miller: Don’t let petty things ruin your senior year, it’s your last year so live it up to the best.

Mac Farricy: Don’t pick hard classes for senior year, you’re not gonna want to do the work.

Sam Hirsch: Don’t be afraid to do your own thing. You might end up really liking it. And who knows, other people might like it too.

Wyatt Campbell: People are here to help. Use them. You’re not alone.

SENIORS: Getting Involved Makes Most of HS Journey

By Andrew Carroll

Senior Staff Writer

My high school experience is something that I’ll never forget, so many great memories that I will always remember. Going to Hanover High School and winning two state championships is at the top of the list for me. But a close second is growing closer with the friends I have made throughout my four years here. Being involved is one of the most important things you can do in school because of the people you meet. The friends I have made through sports have become some of my best friends. Some may have been a couple of grades older, but they taught me what high school was and how to go through it. I am very grateful for those people and I am still friends with all of them, which is why being involved was so important to me. My goal now is to try and do the same thing with my friends who are younger than me. I take them under my wing and show them high school so, when they are seniors, they will know what to expect.

But high school is more than the relationships you build, it’s also the memories you make. It’s a four-year journey and you endure so much together before graduation. Finding out where everyone is going to college and becoming closer as a class during your senior year is something to look forward to. I know everyone tells you that it goes by fast, and they aren’t lying. It really does; one day you’re starting freshman year and, the next thing you know, you will be sitting here on a Sunday night before the last week of school. I encourage anyone who reads this to take a school trip. My trip to Italy was the best experiences of my life, getting to travel the world with one of your best friends is something that might never happen again. Play a sport or join a club, do something that you love because it will take you farther than you think. Lastly, enjoy it, high school is supposed to be fun. It was for me and I hope it is for everyone who gets to read this.

In the next chapter of my life I will be attending Wesleyan University in Connecticut, where I plan on playing both football and baseball. I am currently undecided on my major, but I would love to continue writing about sports and anything that interests me. I want to thank The Indian for taking me in as a sophomore writing about the Patriots every week. I want to thank Trevor Blaisdell (Class of 2017) for showing me that anyone can write for the school newspaper. Lastly, I want to thank Mrs. McHugh for making all of this possible for the last 2 1/2  years. “So I guess it ends here, we’ll go our separate ways and hope we’ll see each other in the future.”

Featured image courtesy of Hanover Public Schools

Seniors: What We’ll Miss

By Chris Acampora

Senior Staff Writer

Hanover High is a special place, and there are definitely a lot of things our seniors will miss about it. Each person has something really unique that they’ll be sad to leave after graduation. Here’s what a few HHS seniors said they will miss most:

  • Ryan K: Band and lunch with the lads
  • Katie D: Señora Aborn and cinco honores
  • Bridget F: Sleeping in the library
  • Alex M: The kids (my friends) and some teachers
  • Ronan R: The friends I have made and the teachers that have been there for me all the time
  • Donovan D: Mr. Depatto and the boys!
  • Brendan M: My teachers
  • Krisna V: hanging with Sara in the library
  • Alex M: my friends
  • Nick C: all the people, not just my friends
  • Tom M: The TLC People
  • Joe R: Sports events
  • Meghan R: The friendships
  • Emily S: Socializing
  • Caroline Z: Seeing my friends every day
  • Matt McL: Wrestling
  • Gia D: Being young because after this it’s the real world
  • Wyatt C: The people
  • Jack D: Popcorn chicken bowls with gravy on everything… Oh!

SENIORS: Highlights of High School

A lot has happened in the last four years at Hanover High, and there’s definitely been a lot of memorable moments that people will never forget. Here are what some HHS seniors said was their favorite memory from their high school experience:

By Chris Acampora

Senior Staff Writer

  • Kayla M: Attending MASC with student council for the first time
  • Swaliha K: The first day of school senior year! The beginning of the end—very bittersweet
  • Donovan D: Meeting the boys
  • Cooper D: Playing on the field at Gillette Stadium during UMass Band Day
  • Chris A: That time my friend Alex and I saved all my art from the dumpster behind the school
  • Abby B: Becoming closer with my friends “The Majors”
  • Josh C: Being able to travel around the country to learn skills with student council
  • Mikayla C: Visiting Quebec City
  • Sam H: When they added hot pretzels in the cafeteria
  • James S: Participating in all of the concerts and shows
  • Harry O.: Trip to Europe with Mr. Perry in 2018
  • Megan R: Going to all the football and hockey games with my friends
  • Jordan Lindsay: cheerleading
  • Mia B: English class junior year, when seniors parade on the last day
  • Ben F: Playing hockey at the TD Garden
  • Janey D: The year our sports teams won multiple championships
  • Nick C: When I broke my collarbone freshman year during lacrosse practice
  • Tom M: Walking through the front door
  • Brendan M: “Giving birth” during a coping skills breathing exercise in Mr. Sprague’s classroom

SENIORS: The future of the Class of 2019

By Tim Sullivan

Staff Writer

As the school year comes to a close, it is natural for seniors to reflect on their high school experiences and look forward to what the future holds. Many members of the Class of 2019 plan to further their education in college, while others will enter the workforce or the Armed Forces. No matter their plans, all anxiously await the new opportunities that will come, including living away from home and experiencing a new level of freedom. 

Alex Stacy is going to UMass Amherst and is most excited to listen to Ariana Grande. She is also looking forward to the food and gaining some knowledge along the way. Sarissa Fazio will join her there, eager to play hockey and have a different schedule. On campus, they may run into Mikayla Chabot, who is looking forward to more freedom, and Siofra Carty, who is excited to build lifelong friendships and explore the world.

Aidan Benway will study entrepreneurship at Suffolk University and is looking forward to living on his own and meeting new people.  Same with Gage Gosule, who is excited for the freedom that comes with living away from home, and Ryan Morgan, who will study business. 

Megan Finnigan is going to Bryant University and is most excited about starting a new college life. She may run into Ben Fein, Jason Bishop and Will Clarkson, who will study business while taking advantage of their newfound independence. Ben is excited to meet new people and see new places.

Matt McLeod will head to Roger Williams University to pursue computer science. He is excited about a “change of scenery.” James Clarkson will join him, playing basketball and studying business.

Kayla Mullane will attend Endicott College and is excited about becoming more independent. Olivia Reddish will join her there, and can’t wait for the dining hall experience.

Caroline Gordon will attend Fairfield University and is looking forward to a change of pace and getting used to a new environment. She’ll be joined by Emily Babin, who is “super pumped” to explore new careers and paths to figure out what she wants to do in the future. Alex McFarland will be on campus as well, studying Education and English.

Anna McCarthy will attend Merrimack College next year and can’t wait to step out of her comfort zone and learn how to be independent. On campus, she may see Kat Lawrence, who is super excited to make some new friends, and Julie Moran, who can’t wait to dive into her Exercise Science major. Matt Jenkins  looks forward to the social life there as he studies Sports Management.

Braden Glynn will study Elementary Education at Westfield State and looks forward to meeting new people. Among the familiar faces will be Zach DeBoer, who will pursue Criminal Justice.

Bee Lee is attending Bridgewater State University and plans on studying business. Lindsay Maslow also will study business, but at Rider University. She is excited to live in New Jersey, a new state for her. Erin Flynn is heading to Marist College.  Abby Cummings and Maggie Munroe will study engineering at Worcester Polytech. 

Cooper Dawson will attend Syracuse University to study International Relations. Bridget Fairweather will attend Emmanuel College to study Forensic Science. Kayleigh McEachern will study nursing at Curry College and is eager to “finally study something I’m excited about.” Maeve McCarthy will attend Providence College to study marketing. Jake Laprise is going to Wheaton College. 

While many students are excited for the freedom college will bring, others are heading for more structure at Mass Maritime Academy. Dan Tiedtke is looking forward to playing rugby and becoming more organized. Joe Petrocelli is expecting more freedom after graduation. Pat McDonald looks forward to “making money after graduation.”

Some students will be traveling far from Hanover after graduation. Emily Sullivan will attend Clemson University and can’t wait for the football games!  Liam Sadek is heading to Georgia Tech to study Material Sciences and Engineering and looking forward to a change of weather. Mady Rossi will  study pre-med at the University of South Florida in Miami. Sam O’Grady will study at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he looks forward to three more months of skiing than he can get in New England. Karly Bruder is heading to Wake Forest University in North Carolina and is excited to experience a new part of the country. Wes Notorangelo will study business at Nashville’s Lipscomb University. Julia Varraso will attend Catholic University in Washington, D.C. Julia Leskow will study at the University of Alabama. Drew Marriner will be traveling to the University of Montana to study Wildlife Biology.

Many students are excited for opportunities to go even farther away from home through study abroad programs. Harry O’Brien and Ethan DaSilva will head to Northeastern University, where their college experience will begin this August in London. Caitlin Parker will spend part of her sophomore year at Sacred Heart University studying in Australia. Jake Dares will travel to Madrid for his freshman year of Suffolk University.

Some students are joining the workforce, including Tom May, while others, like Jonathan Trubiano, are considering the military.  Brendan Murray has been training in preparation for joining the Marines. Alec McArthur will enter an apprenticeship to become an electrician. He’s most excited about “not having debt from college.”

Steve Manolakis will be taking a gap year before entering Ohio State University. He plans to work and train in gymnastics full time in hopes of earning a spot on the college team.

SENIORS: Friendships Forged Through Sports

By Joe Clinton

Senior Staff Writer

Sports have been a huge part of my four years at Hanover High. I’ve played baseball, soccer, basketball and rugby, and I couldn’t imagine not being a part of these teams. 

I made my closest friends on these teams. Your teammates become your family for three straight months and they take you through ups and downs of the season. This past fall, I started playing soccer with all kinds of new kids that I was never really close with. And when the season ended, I had 20 new friends that I would’ve never met outside of high school sports. 

Along with the family feel of high school sports comes a unique opportunity that you will never again have in your life. This opportunity is being able to wear your hometown team across your jersey and see the community rallying around you. This was something I truly took for granted until the end of my final basketball season. After playing my last game in the sold-out Hanover High gym, I realized how much it really meant. How much our teams mean to the community. How much our teams shape the youth athletics of this town. Representing the place you have lived in your whole life is really only something you get with high school sports.

Featured photo used with permission of DJ Meads Photography