Tag Archives: featured

You’re A Good Man Charlie Brown: Students take the stage

By Callia Gilligan

It’s that time of year again: Fall Musical Season! This year, Hanover High School, in partnership with Hanover Performing Arts Company, will be presenting “You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown!”

The hit musical features your favorite Peanuts characters Charlie Brown, Lucy, Shroeder, Linus, Sally, and Snoopy. Written in 1967 by by Clark Gesne, the story returns you to your favorite Peanuts cartoons and reminds you of all the antics this crazy gang can get into. With songs like “Happiness,” “Beatoven Day” “My Blanket & Me,” and “My New Philosophy,” the show is stacked with singing, dancing, and comedy that is sure to make you nostalgic.

The show features a talented cast with Kyle Knight (’20) leading as Charlie Brown. He’s joined by Ben Manning (’22) as Shroeder, Michelle Sylvester (’21) as Sally, Emma Gannon (’20) as Lucy, Chris Manning (’22) as Linus and Julia Cross (’20) as Snoopy. In addition, at the Saturday matinee performance, Lucy will be played by Elise Falvey (’21), Sally will be played by Kat Sheridan (’21) and Erin Foley (’20) will play Snoopy. They are joined by a talented ensemble from all four grades as well.

The show is directed by Mr. Colin Fahey with musical direction by Mr. Micheal Wade. There is also a student-led technical crew!

You won’t want to miss this sensation! Performances will be Nov. 21 and Nov. 22 at 7 pm, and Nov. 23 at 2 pm and 7 pm.

 

Spirit Week 2019

By Tim Sullivan

Just like that, another Spirit Week and Homecoming have come and gone!

This year the Spirit Week themes were:

Monday: America Day 

Tuesday: Hawaiian Day

Wednesday: Decade Day

Thursday: Jersey Day

Friday: Class Color Day

Seniors led the way with the most participants on Decade and Class Color Days. Juniors had just as much spirit, rocking America and Jersey Days. The sophomores took the crown for Hawaiian Day.

The annual Spirit Week Rally was held on Friday, Oct. 25 and included performances by our band and cheerleaders, along with exciting events such as a race across the gym with teams wrapped in saran wrap. A noise competition, judged by Doc DeFranzo, revealed which class was the loudest – spoiler alert: the Seniors won, but the Juniors made it a close contest.

That night, Hanover hosted North Quincy for our Homecoming game and won 33-6. During half time, this year’s Homecoming court was announced. Seniors Bella Craft and Evan Bilton are Hanover’s Homecoming Queen and King! Sara Norton, Erin Halpin, and Lauren Reynolds along with Ethan Ghostlaw, Ethan Richie, and Tim Sullivan were also recognized as our Homecoming Court.

On Saturday, Oct. 26, HHS held its annual Homecoming Dance. Except for the abundance of crowd surfing, the dance went on as usual and this was the final event of our Spirit Week for 2019. Check out some pictures below!

 

 

Many Kids Feel Broken on the Inside

By Sam Wing

It was on the rare occasion that I saw my aunt. We were sitting down at the kitchen table talking about how each of us was doing. At some point in our conversation she told me, “ I don’t know why, but your generation is struggling.” Even before she had told me this, I was already aware of the idea that kids nowadays are truly struggling. It’s the fact that I had heard someone actually say the truth out loud that really hit me. What she said got me thinking for days about what was the cause for all of this strife. 

Now, I’ll try my best not to bore anyone who’s reading this article, but in order to understand the present, we must understand the past. Before all of these technological advances that we have now, we just had the world itself. Meaning that people didn’t stare at their devices or watch a Saturday Night Live episode at 12:30 am. People just had each other, and whatever nature had to provide. Back then, kids would go out and just play in the streets with each other until the sun began to fall. When the sun went down, they would say their goodbyes to each other and rush inside for a hot meal with their family. Then, after dinner as a family, it was bedtime. That was it; well, not entirely. They still had school, but school was never as intense as it is now. 

Now I know some of you are sitting there thinking, “ Like, what was the point of explaining that?” Well the point of explaining that, was to show you what kids used to be like then, and well, how they are now. Nowadays, “ an hour of free play is like a drop of water in the desert (Brooks).” Kids don’t have that luxury anymore of going outside and playing in the streets. Many kids deal with the stress of getting into the best college, having the “golden” transcript, making the varsity soccer team, or even worrying if their parents will make it home for dinner. These are just a couple of examples, but it just goes to show that things like these are what gives kids that anxiety or even depression.

In an article by The New York Times, Kim Brooks explains to readers the increase in depression and suicidal thoughts in kids nowadays. “ According to the psychologist Peter Gray, children today are more depressed than they were during the Great Depression and more anxious than they were at the height of the Cold War. A 2019 study published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology found that between 2009 and 2017, rates of depression rose by more than 60 percent among those ages 14 to 17, and 47 percent among those ages 12 to 13.”

I remember reading this portion of the article and having my mind blown into a million pieces. For years, I felt that I was wrong to think that kids nowadays were worse off, but who knew that my gut feeling was actually right. However, it didn’t end there. Just because I had gotten the answer I had wondered about for years, didn’t mean that I was gonna stop pushing deeper for the true reason of this tragedy. So I sat there for a solid 15 minutes and came to my conclusion. Kids have all these responsibilities that kids back then would never have to deal with. So I asked myself, “ Where did all of these new responsibilities come from?” They came from us, the human race. As we kept inventing and growing our culture, there came new tasks. For instance, we had the “medical boom.” Doctors and medicine improved greatly, causing humans to have a greater lifespan. And with a greater lifespan, that meant that they had more time to keep working and create more. With more innovations and expectations, comes more jobs and tasks for people to worry about. And with this growth, in everything, we began to crave more. 

We all want perfection, whether we will admit it or not. But the truth is is that we can’t have perfection because it doesn’t exist. We keep chasing after these ridiculous things because it’s what our society claims is the best. We live in a world that only praises the best, and looks down on the worst. We don’t want to be looked down on by others, so we paint an image. Or a better way to phrase it is a fake image. To pretend that we all have our lives together so others don’t make a fool out of us. It’s kind of crazy to think about it in that way, but it’s the truth. The reason why kids are worse off today is because we feel trapped. Like the whole world is yelling at us to do everything, and do everything right when we can’t. One person can’t do it all without having a breakdown. We all have our own limits in life, but lately, we all tend to ignore our limits. 

So what now? What do we do from here? Honestly, I don’t know. I’ve only lived on this planet for 16 years. I haven’t seen enough of the world to see what else is going on. So I guess for now all we really can do is stop. Stop thinking about all the chaos in our lives and just stop and take the time to take care of ourselves mentally more often than physically. And maybe, just maybe, we’ll all come to realize that mental health really matters. 

Article: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/17/opinion/sunday/childhood-suicide-depression-anxiety.html?searchResultPosition=1

Featured image: https://www.nutraceuticalbusinessreview.com/news/article_page/Research_shows_extract_improves_anxiety_and_depressive_symptoms/143911

 

Spirit Week is Just Around the Corner

By Tim Sullivan

Believe it or not, it’s almost time for our Spirit Week and Rally! Next week, we have a short week because of Columbus Day and the following week is Spirit Week. October 21st through the 25th will include the following spirit days:

Monday (10/21): America Monday

Tuesday (10/22): Hawaiian Day

Wednesday (10/23): Decades Day

Thursday (10/24): Jersey Day

Friday (10/25): Class Color Day

Also on Friday is the Rally which will include exciting activities put on by the Student Council Executive Board. Sign-ups for Rally activities will begin this Wednesday (10/9) with a sign-up sheet in the cafeteria near the snack area. Some activities are available for all grades to participate and others are reserved for just the senior class. Make sure to grab a spot and sign-up for these exciting events!

Political Pilot: 5 Things You Should Know About Politics

By Henry Adams

Political discourse can be hard to understand, especially in today’s world, where problems and concepts such as immigration, relations between the U.S. and North Korea, and even the erecting of a park in your town all seem to be more complex than at face value. How do we understand the political terminology laid before us? When it comes to solving political problems, here are some things you can use to help you wade through these complicated issues.

1: What are political positions?

A political position is what your beliefs usually correlate with. For example, in the United States, we have political parties. The two most popular parties are the Democratic Party and the Republican Party, but that still leave many wondering “who do I side with?” In order to answer that, you need to decide which political party solves problems the way you want them to be solved. I also suggest you take the Political Compass test to see where you align. 

2: What is the difference between local, national, and geopolitical happenings?

The differences between local, national and geopolitics can be hard to understand at first, however they are very simple in context. Local politics is what happens within your state or even town or city. Local politics usually deals with smaller issues on a state level, such as building parks and funding schools. National politics is what happens within a country or nation, such as border policy, federal taxes/laws, firearms regulations, etc.  Geopolitics is what is going on in other parts of the globe, such as war, countries’ relationships, groups such as NATO, etc.

3: How do I know what I am reading is real news?

Fake news is an epidemic in today’s society even to a point where fact-checking sites such as Snopes are pushing false narratives, such as in the case with its fact-checking of the $6 billion in government contracts that went missing while Hillary Clinton was Secretary of State. Apparently, according to Snopes, “unaccounted for” doesn’t mean the same as “missing.”  So how do you beat fake news? Don’t rely on the news; do your own research and watch full unedited recordings of speeches and events to understand a topic before you support it.

4: How does politics affect me?

Politics affects us every day, from how much we pay in taxes to what is and isn’t banned. Politics has equally good and bad effects on our everyday life. The 18th Amendment banning alcohol, for example, was passed in 1919 and was repealed in 1933. Amendments are similar to laws, but make changes to the Constitution. The American people rebelled against the amendment through bootlegging and speakeasies. It was so unpopular that it was repealed by the 21st Amendment, making it the only amendment to have ever been repealed to date.

5: Why should I listen to the opposition?

    Even though some peoples’ ideas may seem immoral or wrong, that isn’t grounds to alienate them, unless they have alienated you first. There is a reason for everything. People’s beliefs don’t come from thin air, and there has to be something that caused them such as  statistics, news, and even their own logic. In politics today, we seem to have lost the ability to debate and disagree without anger. But taking the time to understand a point of view different from your own may either open your eyes to new ideas or strengthen your arguments for your current beliefs.

 

 

 

The Hanover High Cricket(s)

By Tim Sullivan

Have you noticed something different about HHS this year? I’m not talking about everyone’s cell phones hanging on the walls or the missing pod couches. I’m talking about the noise you hear when passing through the cafeteria. *Chirp* *Chirp*. There seems to be a cricket living near the large glass doors in the cafeteria and it is very talkative, constantly chirping and calling attention to itself. Does HHS have a cricket problem? As I look into this more, it is clear that there is more than just that one single cricket living on our campus.

Confirmed Sightings:

Senior Mia Anastasiades spotted a cricket running by her on the track earlier this week

Senior Lily Tobin attempted to quiet the cafeteria cricket by spraying it with perfume, but it seems a new cricket has arrived and, in an act of vengeance, has begun chirping.

Senior Erin Halpin also found and got rid of one in the cafeteria.

Senior Abbey Baldwin has heard several chirps in the locker room.

Several teachers have reported one hanging out in a stairwell near the engineering room.

Clearly, it seems that HHS has a population of chatty crickets on our campus that seems to be growing. . . .  Have you seen or heard crickets around? Keep an eye and ear out for these spooky insects.

Dominican Republic Trip: Science, Service, Sun

By Matt O’Hara

If you’re interested in conservation, community service or even just spending February vacation in a land guaranteed to be much warmer than snowy New England, Mrs. Emerson is looking for you.

The HHS science teacher has planned 8-day service trip  to the Dominican Republic which will teach students about the importance of coral reefs in the environment, and how overfishing, tourism and climate change are damaging the coral reefs in the Caribbean. While on the trip, students will team up with Verde Profundo, an organization dedicated to rebuilding coral reefs, to gather coral reef shards that have been separated from their reefs and have washed up on Dominican beaches. The students will then transplant the fragments back into the reefs and help preserve the important, but fragile, ocean ecosystem. Students will also meet with marine biologists to learn about different types of coral reefs and their impact on the environment. When the students have downtime, they can educate themselves about the interesting culture of the Dominican Republic and explore the beautiful area, while participating in memorable activities such as snorkeling.

Only a few spots remain for the trip, according to Mrs. Emerson, who visited the country herself this summer. “To say the least, it was a profoundly moving and influential experience,” she said.  “I can honestly say that [you] are going to have the experience of a lifetime.”

If you are interested in learning more, please attend the student and parent meeting about the trip on October 4th.