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Many Kids Feel Broken on the Inside

By Sam Wing

It was on the rare occasion that I saw my aunt. We were sitting down at the kitchen table talking about how each of us was doing. At some point in our conversation she told me, “ I don’t know why, but your generation is struggling.” Even before she had told me this, I was already aware of the idea that kids nowadays are truly struggling. It’s the fact that I had heard someone actually say the truth out loud that really hit me. What she said got me thinking for days about what was the cause for all of this strife. 

Now, I’ll try my best not to bore anyone who’s reading this article, but in order to understand the present, we must understand the past. Before all of these technological advances that we have now, we just had the world itself. Meaning that people didn’t stare at their devices or watch a Saturday Night Live episode at 12:30 am. People just had each other, and whatever nature had to provide. Back then, kids would go out and just play in the streets with each other until the sun began to fall. When the sun went down, they would say their goodbyes to each other and rush inside for a hot meal with their family. Then, after dinner as a family, it was bedtime. That was it; well, not entirely. They still had school, but school was never as intense as it is now. 

Now I know some of you are sitting there thinking, “ Like, what was the point of explaining that?” Well the point of explaining that, was to show you what kids used to be like then, and well, how they are now. Nowadays, “ an hour of free play is like a drop of water in the desert (Brooks).” Kids don’t have that luxury anymore of going outside and playing in the streets. Many kids deal with the stress of getting into the best college, having the “golden” transcript, making the varsity soccer team, or even worrying if their parents will make it home for dinner. These are just a couple of examples, but it just goes to show that things like these are what gives kids that anxiety or even depression.

In an article by The New York Times, Kim Brooks explains to readers the increase in depression and suicidal thoughts in kids nowadays. “ According to the psychologist Peter Gray, children today are more depressed than they were during the Great Depression and more anxious than they were at the height of the Cold War. A 2019 study published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology found that between 2009 and 2017, rates of depression rose by more than 60 percent among those ages 14 to 17, and 47 percent among those ages 12 to 13.”

I remember reading this portion of the article and having my mind blown into a million pieces. For years, I felt that I was wrong to think that kids nowadays were worse off, but who knew that my gut feeling was actually right. However, it didn’t end there. Just because I had gotten the answer I had wondered about for years, didn’t mean that I was gonna stop pushing deeper for the true reason of this tragedy. So I sat there for a solid 15 minutes and came to my conclusion. Kids have all these responsibilities that kids back then would never have to deal with. So I asked myself, “ Where did all of these new responsibilities come from?” They came from us, the human race. As we kept inventing and growing our culture, there came new tasks. For instance, we had the “medical boom.” Doctors and medicine improved greatly, causing humans to have a greater lifespan. And with a greater lifespan, that meant that they had more time to keep working and create more. With more innovations and expectations, comes more jobs and tasks for people to worry about. And with this growth, in everything, we began to crave more. 

We all want perfection, whether we will admit it or not. But the truth is is that we can’t have perfection because it doesn’t exist. We keep chasing after these ridiculous things because it’s what our society claims is the best. We live in a world that only praises the best, and looks down on the worst. We don’t want to be looked down on by others, so we paint an image. Or a better way to phrase it is a fake image. To pretend that we all have our lives together so others don’t make a fool out of us. It’s kind of crazy to think about it in that way, but it’s the truth. The reason why kids are worse off today is because we feel trapped. Like the whole world is yelling at us to do everything, and do everything right when we can’t. One person can’t do it all without having a breakdown. We all have our own limits in life, but lately, we all tend to ignore our limits. 

So what now? What do we do from here? Honestly, I don’t know. I’ve only lived on this planet for 16 years. I haven’t seen enough of the world to see what else is going on. So I guess for now all we really can do is stop. Stop thinking about all the chaos in our lives and just stop and take the time to take care of ourselves mentally more often than physically. And maybe, just maybe, we’ll all come to realize that mental health really matters. 

Article: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/17/opinion/sunday/childhood-suicide-depression-anxiety.html?searchResultPosition=1

Featured image: https://www.nutraceuticalbusinessreview.com/news/article_page/Research_shows_extract_improves_anxiety_and_depressive_symptoms/143911

 

Spirit Week is Just Around the Corner

By Tim Sullivan

Believe it or not, it’s almost time for our Spirit Week and Rally! Next week, we have a short week because of Columbus Day and the following week is Spirit Week. October 21st through the 25th will include the following spirit days:

Monday (10/21): America Monday

Tuesday (10/22): Hawaiian Day

Wednesday (10/23): Decades Day

Thursday (10/24): Jersey Day

Friday (10/25): Class Color Day

Also on Friday is the Rally which will include exciting activities put on by the Student Council Executive Board. Sign-ups for Rally activities will begin this Wednesday (10/9) with a sign-up sheet in the cafeteria near the snack area. Some activities are available for all grades to participate and others are reserved for just the senior class. Make sure to grab a spot and sign-up for these exciting events!

Political Pilot: 5 Things You Should Know About Politics

By Henry Adams

Political discourse can be hard to understand, especially in today’s world, where problems and concepts such as immigration, relations between the U.S. and North Korea, and even the erecting of a park in your town all seem to be more complex than at face value. How do we understand the political terminology laid before us? When it comes to solving political problems, here are some things you can use to help you wade through these complicated issues.

1: What are political positions?

A political position is what your beliefs usually correlate with. For example, in the United States, we have political parties. The two most popular parties are the Democratic Party and the Republican Party, but that still leave many wondering “who do I side with?” In order to answer that, you need to decide which political party solves problems the way you want them to be solved. I also suggest you take the Political Compass test to see where you align. 

2: What is the difference between local, national, and geopolitical happenings?

The differences between local, national and geopolitics can be hard to understand at first, however they are very simple in context. Local politics is what happens within your state or even town or city. Local politics usually deals with smaller issues on a state level, such as building parks and funding schools. National politics is what happens within a country or nation, such as border policy, federal taxes/laws, firearms regulations, etc.  Geopolitics is what is going on in other parts of the globe, such as war, countries’ relationships, groups such as NATO, etc.

3: How do I know what I am reading is real news?

Fake news is an epidemic in today’s society even to a point where fact-checking sites such as Snopes are pushing false narratives, such as in the case with its fact-checking of the $6 billion in government contracts that went missing while Hillary Clinton was Secretary of State. Apparently, according to Snopes, “unaccounted for” doesn’t mean the same as “missing.”  So how do you beat fake news? Don’t rely on the news; do your own research and watch full unedited recordings of speeches and events to understand a topic before you support it.

4: How does politics affect me?

Politics affects us every day, from how much we pay in taxes to what is and isn’t banned. Politics has equally good and bad effects on our everyday life. The 18th Amendment banning alcohol, for example, was passed in 1919 and was repealed in 1933. Amendments are similar to laws, but make changes to the Constitution. The American people rebelled against the amendment through bootlegging and speakeasies. It was so unpopular that it was repealed by the 21st Amendment, making it the only amendment to have ever been repealed to date.

5: Why should I listen to the opposition?

    Even though some peoples’ ideas may seem immoral or wrong, that isn’t grounds to alienate them, unless they have alienated you first. There is a reason for everything. People’s beliefs don’t come from thin air, and there has to be something that caused them such as  statistics, news, and even their own logic. In politics today, we seem to have lost the ability to debate and disagree without anger. But taking the time to understand a point of view different from your own may either open your eyes to new ideas or strengthen your arguments for your current beliefs.

 

 

 

The Hanover High Cricket(s)

By Tim Sullivan

Have you noticed something different about HHS this year? I’m not talking about everyone’s cell phones hanging on the walls or the missing pod couches. I’m talking about the noise you hear when passing through the cafeteria. *Chirp* *Chirp*. There seems to be a cricket living near the large glass doors in the cafeteria and it is very talkative, constantly chirping and calling attention to itself. Does HHS have a cricket problem? As I look into this more, it is clear that there is more than just that one single cricket living on our campus.

Confirmed Sightings:

Senior Mia Anastasiades spotted a cricket running by her on the track earlier this week

Senior Lily Tobin attempted to quiet the cafeteria cricket by spraying it with perfume, but it seems a new cricket has arrived and, in an act of vengeance, has begun chirping.

Senior Erin Halpin also found and got rid of one in the cafeteria.

Senior Abbey Baldwin has heard several chirps in the locker room.

Several teachers have reported one hanging out in a stairwell near the engineering room.

Clearly, it seems that HHS has a population of chatty crickets on our campus that seems to be growing. . . .  Have you seen or heard crickets around? Keep an eye and ear out for these spooky insects.

Dominican Republic Trip: Science, Service, Sun

By Matt O’Hara

If you’re interested in conservation, community service or even just spending February vacation in a land guaranteed to be much warmer than snowy New England, Mrs. Emerson is looking for you.

The HHS science teacher has planned 8-day service trip  to the Dominican Republic which will teach students about the importance of coral reefs in the environment, and how overfishing, tourism and climate change are damaging the coral reefs in the Caribbean. While on the trip, students will team up with Verde Profundo, an organization dedicated to rebuilding coral reefs, to gather coral reef shards that have been separated from their reefs and have washed up on Dominican beaches. The students will then transplant the fragments back into the reefs and help preserve the important, but fragile, ocean ecosystem. Students will also meet with marine biologists to learn about different types of coral reefs and their impact on the environment. When the students have downtime, they can educate themselves about the interesting culture of the Dominican Republic and explore the beautiful area, while participating in memorable activities such as snorkeling.

Only a few spots remain for the trip, according to Mrs. Emerson, who visited the country herself this summer. “To say the least, it was a profoundly moving and influential experience,” she said.  “I can honestly say that [you] are going to have the experience of a lifetime.”

If you are interested in learning more, please attend the student and parent meeting about the trip on October 4th.

 

My Experience as a Junior Maine Guide: Tough but Rewarding

This summer I had the opportunity to participate in the Junior Maine Guide Program (JMG). JMG is sponsored by the Maine Summer Camps Association and Maine’s Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. A Maine Guide is someone who is legally licensed by the state of Maine to be paid to lead wilderness trips within the state. This can include whitewater rafting, hunting, fishing, kayaking or the most common, recreation. Junior Maine Guide was started by Maine Summer Camps Association with approval from the DIFW. A majority of Maine summer camps offer the JMG program. It’s a four-week ordeal.  For three weeks you learn about how to be a “trip leader” and then you attend a five-day testing camp in Rangely, Maine, where you are tested on skills such as axemanship, wet day fire, first aid, canoeing, and topographic maps. JMG is honestly hard to understand if you’ve never done it yourself, but I’ll try my best to explain the program through my experience. 

I went into JMG with no idea how physically, emotionally and mentally taxing the program was going to be. I’ve been attending my summer camp for five years. When I was 12, I was first introduced to JMG. My summer camp offered one of the JMG programs for younger campers called Junior Maine Woodsmen. I went through that, passed and, when I was 13, I participated in Maine Woodsmen in order to have eligibility to participate in JMG. I passed MW, but then decided to wait a year and do JMG for my last summer as a camper. 

JMG met two activity periods every day. There were five other girls from my camp doing the program with me. It was a lot of taking notes and studying. It was kind of like school in the summer except you were learning to take care not only for yourself in the wilderness but also for a group of younger campers. We had to learn lots of skills for written tests like First Aid and Map of Maine, but the practical tests were the most important. I learned how to swing an ax and build a fire in under 20 minutes with a wet piece of wood. This was all in preparation for a five-day testing camp.

JMG took up a lot of my summer. Every morning I would wake up at 7 am and study. I made an insane amount of flashcards and had my cabinmates quiz me. I once used my best friend as a First Aid dummy to practice. Most free swims and every rest hour, I would study. JMG took a huge physical toll on my body as well. When we first learned axemanship, I woke up the next morning feeling so sore in places I didn’t think were relative to splitting wood. 

I don’t think I’ve ever been more stressed than in the days leading up to JMG. I couldn’t eat or sleep very much. One of the most hyped-up tests for JMG is “Wet Day Fire.” With a wet day, a billet of wood gets soaked in water for 5 minutes. In order to pass the test, you need to split the billet to get to the dry wood, build a fire with it, and get a small can of water to boil over in under 20 minutes. It’s extremely challenging, and its only a minor. What’s scary about Wet Day Fire is it’s the only test where you know whether you passed or failed right on the spot. If you don’t pass, it can shake your confidence for the rest of the testing camp. The day before we left for testing camp, I still hadn’t completed a successful wet day. I went to try one more time before we left. To my surprise, I did it in 13:06, the fastest time out of anyone in my JMG group. This gave me so much more confidence going into what would be the most stressful but rewarding week of my life. 

Onto the fun part! Testing camp. The testing camp is “5 days” but in reality, it’s really only three days of testing. Three days to take 22 tests. We arrived on Monday and set up our camp. We were assigned a campsite, and from then on, you need to set up your tent, chopping block, fire pit and camp kitchen area. Every day, you need to keep your encampment looking as good as it did on the first day; in fact, that’s one of the tests. You are also graded on your cooking. So the first real test is Monday night dinner. At every meal, a tester comes to eat with you. In order to pass cooking, you need to have at least one successful bake, boil, and fry. They grade you basically on whether the meal was balanced, nutritious, complex and edible. They also want you to make sure you’re making good conversation with the testers. What’s good, though, is that if you fail a meal, they notify you and you have a chance to try again on another day.

Monday is not that stressful of a day, but Tuesday is where it picks up. On Tuesday I took lots of written tests, almost every minor expect the ones I needed to study for a bit more, and a couple of written majors. I also took my ax and canoe test. Canoeing, I thought, was very up in the air. In the canoe test, you need to be able to solo a canoe and answer general canoe questions for a tester sitting in front of you while you paddle. I missed a couple of questions, but my canoeing was pretty strong. I really had no clue how it went but because I was so stressed, I thought I failed. My ax test went extremely well. I had the tester who went to my summer camp. My camp has always had a reputation to be bad at ax so my tester was really happy with my skills. 

Tuesday night, we were reminded that Wet Day Fire Testing was the next day. I was so stressed, I cried myself to sleep that night. The next morning, I was a huge bundle of nerves. I barely got through my topographic maps test. The practical part of that test went well, the written did not. There were more tears right before I took my Wet Day because I watched one of my friends not pass hers. When the time came for me to take my test, I was panicking. I took several deep breaths and told myself that I could do it. When the tester said go, I swung my ax and went to town. Wet Day can have a lot of factors that make it really difficult. For instance, if the piece of wood you’re using is riddled with knots, it can make splitting the wood very difficult. Yay for me, that’s how my wet day wood was. It took me a good five minutes to split it, and normally, I could be done with my ax by three. Because of this, I went into panic mode. I very rapidly made wood pieces with my knife but making the wood shavings to start the fire took me a while. Once I had a good fire going, the stupid wind started to put it out. I just kept adding more and more wood until I had a huge fire. By then, someone near me had finished in 18:00 minutes. I was almost about to give up, I had no more wood to put on my fire and I was almost out of time. Luckily, one of the testers came over to me and was really encouraging. He told me that I had enough wood, my water was about to boil. What I needed to do was blow on the fire. That would give it more oxygen and help the water boil over. By then, another tester was over around my fire pit. They said to keep blowing on the fire and be patient, I was still in this. My fire was so hot, I singed my eyebrow. I was blowing on my fire until I literally couldn’t breathe. I noticed the fire had gone out and I looked up, the water had boiled over. “Ahh!” one of the testers yelled. I yelled “Time!” There was a moment of panic because the tester keeping track of time didn’t respond for a second. After what seemed like forever, she said “19:23.” I burst into tears. That was honestly one of the best moments of my life. I looked over to see my counselor had made it to watch the last couple of minutes of my test. The smile on her face made me cry even harder. I had to take a second to just look at my fire because I was so in shock and so proud. One of my friends thought I didn’t pass because I was so close to time and was crying. The rest of that day, I took very few tests, but there were more tears because I was stressed about this one test I was taking, Hiking and Backpacking. 

Thursday was a blur. It was a lot of crying and tests I thought I failed as well as tears of joy when it finally came time for the last campfire. One counselor told us before we left for testing camp, “if you don’t cry at least four times at testing camp, what are you doing?”  I have never been so relieved to be done with anything. I was so happy testing camp was over but so sad the JMG as a whole was too. 

When we got back to camp on Friday, It was so great to see everyone. We talked with one of the counselors who wasn’t able to go to the testing camp and told her all the funny things that happened while we were there. I was also so nervous though because we would know our results until Sunday.

When I woke up Sunday morning, I cried and then nearly threw up because my stomach was so tangled in a knot. I didn’t find out my results until right before I had to go visit my brother at his camp. The JMG counselor had us wait on this deck while one by one we went down and she gave us the news. When she handed me my test sheet she said, “No matter what’s on this, I’m so proud of you.” My eyes went immediately to the bottom of the page where it said, “Retest.” My heart dropped. I couldn’t even really get out tears because I was just so shaken. When the other JMGs were told by our other counselor I didn’t pass, everybody started crying, half out of sadness for me and half out of being scared they weren’t going to pass either. When I saw all of their red faces, that’s when tears came. There were lots of hugs and as I learned about whether the other girls passed or failed. I didn’t really cry more or less. I was genuinely so proud of all of my friends that I watched grow through this experience.

The rest of the day, I couldn’t function. My counselor had to take away the sheet with my test results because I kept staring at it and crying. What was so disappointing was that I came so close to passing. In order to pass, you can only fail 2 majors and I failed 3 and one minor. Two of the tests I failed, I came within 1-1.5  points of passing. It felt like passing was just beyond reach, and I almost had it. 

Over time, though, the tears went away and I realized something really important: how much I grew through this program. I became such a leader and my confidence has gone up. If I hadn’t done this, there was no way I would have been able to write an article about my failures. I learned so much, not just about the wilderness but how to handle failure. Crying and being angry is okay but eventually, you have to pick yourself back up and realize what your experience taught you. No one can take away the fact that I learned how to swing an ax or solo a canoe, and I learned to be independent and responsible, and I learned how to pick myself back up, even after I failed at something that I cared so deeply about. The rest of the summer, I encouraged younger girls to do JMG the next summer. I kept my Wet Day Billets with my times written on them and my compass and name tag displayed on my shelves and I openly talked about what this program has meant to me. 

JMG, pass or fail, is the most rewarding thing I have ever done. I’m so glad that I stepped outside my comfort zone and tried something new. JMG strengthened my love for the outdoors and made me so much more confident in myself. I’m so grateful that I was able to have this kind of experience that you can’t get anywhere else. 

Boston Players, Fans Primed for Stanley Cup Final

By Drew Murphy

To say the Boston Bruins have been amazing this year is an understatement. Tonight, they begin their 19th Stanley Cup Final and have a shot at winning their 7th NHL championship.

The Bruins started out by grinding out the regular season, finishing second in their division and second in the whole league with over 100 points on the season. In the first round of playoffs, they faced the Toronto Maple Leafs,a league rival and Original Six foe. Over the years, the Bruins have consistently beaten the Leafs in the playoffs, including a miraculous comeback in 2013 when the Bruins scored four goals in the dying minutes of the first game of the opening round series . This year, the two teams went to seven games in a grueling battle that ended with suspension, bruises and blood. 

Next up was the Columbus Blue Jackets, another very tough team who happened to be coming off the most historic first-round ever. As the last-seeded team in the playoffs, the Blue Jackets beat the top seed in a four-game sweep. The Bruins again faced a team that would give them a run for their money.  The Bruins had a 3-2 lead in the series heading into game 6, which started off extremely fast-paced with plenty of scoring chances for both teams. Eventually, veteran forward David Krejci put one home, giving the Bruins momentum and the rest of the game was theirs. David Backes and Marcus Johansson scored and the Bruins won 3-0. 

In the semifinals, they faced the Carolina Hurricanes, an unlikely opponent that grinded its way through the early rounds. The Bruins took care of them in a four game sweep, getting contributions from all four lines and especially Tuukka Rask, the goaltender having one of the best performances in the playoffs.

Going into the finals against the St. Louis Blues, the Bruins are locked in and focused and know what they need to do to win. With contributions from 1st line All-Stars Brad Marchand, Patrice Bergeron and David Pastrnak to 4th line standouts Sean Kuraly, Joakim Nordstrom, Noel Accarica and Chris Wagner,  the Bruins will be in great shape. The fans and the team are ready for the Boston Bruins to bring home their seventh Stanley Cup.